The Vineyards

Barossa Valley

The Glaetzer mission is to focus, simply on the production of small-volume, super premium Barossa Valley wines.

The company holds a firm belief that the wines are made in the vineyard - a combination of the French notion terroir and Australian vineyard site knowledge.

The Barossa Valley is one of the most famous regions of South Australia. With an abundant history dating back to 1847 and a distinctive – and profound - Silesian (German) influence, it is asserting its importance, and the immeasurable value of its storehouse of century old vines and historic wineries.

Vineyards

All fruit for Glaetzer Wines is taken from the small sub-region of the northern Barossa Valley, called Ebenezer.

The ancient dry-grown vineyards in the renowned Ebenezer district are an important part of Australia’s winemaking heritage and a living link to traditional Barossa viticulture.

Exceptional fruit from a loyal group of third and fourth generation Barossa grape growers is the backbone of Glaetzer wines. The viticulture used is standard single wine, with permanent arm, rod and spur.

The most exceptional fruit is sourced from 80-110 year old, non-grafted bush vines which are extremely low yielding.
The oldest vines bear only 0.5 to 1 tonne per acre. Younger vines produce 2.5 to 3 tonnes per acre.

Most of the vineyards are non-irrigated but some of the newer vines (propagated from original plantings) have supplementary drip irrigation to combat stress in drought years.

The very old vines require minimal attention. Their deep root structure means they are self-sufficient and can adapt to climatic extremes.

2015 Glaetzer Vintage Report

Climate

The climate and soils of the Barossa Valley vary markedly from north to south. The warmer Ebenezer district has low rainfall and relative humidity which results in full, intensely-coloured wines. The softness, elegance and approachability of Ebenezer fruit has become the hallmark of the Glaetzer 'house style’.

Soil

Ebenezer has a unique soil profile. The well-drained sandy clay loam over a solid limestone pan is perfect for growing Shiraz. The soil is 'mean' and encourages deep roots which helps produce hugely concentrated wines of great character.